Blink—And They're Grown

Parents, Families and Child Care


Playing With Water

water-play-1

Welcome to our special guest-blogger: Anna Peloquin! Anna and her children attend 4C Play & Learn groups. Thank you to Anna for sharing this story with us!

At first, my daughter was afraid of water; every time we would put her in the tub she would cry and usually, bath time was 2 minutes or less (just enough time to wipe the soap off). But as she has grown and learned to explore the world around her she has grown to love water. Finding a muddy puddle on our rainy-day walks brings smiles to both of our faces, and I have rediscovered the joy of puddle jumping. Water is vital to our survival and an essential part of how we clean, cook, and wash our clothes. The simple actions of washing hands, pouring water from a pitcher, even drinking from an open cup are all skills that children must learn as they become more independent. But as with most child-like things these simple tasks that we take for granted can entertain and be great fun for a child (and parent!).

So one miserable, drizzly day, instead of sitting inside we put on our boots went out to play with water. We spent the whole afternoon pouring water into different containers. By the end, we were both soaked, but my daughter had learned how to pour from a pitcher and we enjoyed our day playing with water.

Items for exploration:

  • Cups or funnels of various sizes and weight (we used two plastic cups)
  • Scoops and slotted spoons (raid the kitchen drawer and see what you can find!)
  • Pitcher (lightweight and non-breakable is best) or if you don’t have a pitcher you can cut one up from an empty clean half-gallon milk jug
  • Large plastic tub or cooler to store the water in
  • Gallon of water (we just filled an empty milk jug) that was our ration and when it was gone it was gone.