Blink—And They're Grown

Parents, Families and Child Care

Toilet Learning

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toilet-learning

“Potty Training”

This phrase conjures many thoughts for me:

“Hooray! No more diapers!”

“’Training’? Is he a puppy? There has to be a better way to put this.”

“He’s ready, right?”

“Should we use training pants? Or go straight to underwear?”

“Do we have carpet cleaner on hand? I’d better stock up.”

I happen to find this milestone one of my least favorite. While it is very exciting to have my child developing and growing, it is not always fun to continuously have another human being’s elimination habits at the forefront of our daily life. Having done this once previously, we are changing things up a bit to hopefully make this more successful.

We are working to not confuse this child’s cognitive and language skills with his body’s readiness to recognize when he needs to use the toilet.

Our first child had great communication and cognitive skills that made him seem much older than he was, and so we fell into the habit of expecting too much from his still young self. This ended up making toilet learning much more stressful for everyone. This time, our two-year-old is showing interest in using the toilet, is open to using it when we’ve made it part of the daily routine, and no one is trying to push or rush him into things. We’re trying to use a much more laid back and open-ended approach.

We are not taking the first little sign that he might be ready as a no-holds-barred full leap into abandoning current routines and starting the whole toilet thing at once.

Previously, we took a small sign that our child liked to flush the toilet as a sign to fully snowball into complete toilet learning. We’re really easing into the process this time around. It started many months ago with us helping him identify what had happened in his diaper during changes, just to introduce language. Then came the option to use the toilet before bath time to gradually incorporate the toilet into this routine. Next, we tried to “catch” him during play routines when he showed physical signs that something was happening. We partnered with our child care provider who began to help him use the toilet at each diaper change.

And here we are now. Ready to make the next step of leaving diapers behind and making sure we have many changes of clothes ready for accidents. I discussed with our child care provider that we are at this next step in the process, and she shared that having him wear rubber shoes (like Crocs) will make cleanup much easier, and special potty shoes can be a fun motivator for children. What a fun idea! Overall, we’re trying to remind ourselves that toilet learning is a process and we’ll arrive at the finish line when our child is ready—not necessarily when we’re ready.

Do you have any tried-and-true tips to make toilet learning easier?

Author: ElizabethvSingleton

Elizabeth is a Quality Programs Specialist, working with child care providers to make meaningful connections between training and classroom application in the Northern Kentucky Region. Her background in early childhood education met its match in the daily reality of being mom to two boys, ages six and two. Along with her supportive husband, Elizabeth strives to make daily moments meaningful in the lives of her children and family.

One thought on “Toilet Learning

  1. It does tend to be easier after the first child – mainly, as you say, because you’ve learned so much about what to do and what not to do. The one thing I always remind parents of: Have you ever met an adult who wasn’t potty-trained? It’ll happen eventually. Don’t stress.