Blink—And They're Grown

Parents, Families and Child Care

The Child Connection

Children live in the moment. There's no reason we can't, too.The alarm clock blared at 6 a.m. and I willed myself out of bed. Every year for the past seven years I would have already been at the starting line, nervously waiting for the start of the Flying Pig Marathon. But this year a nagging foot injury kept me from participating, and instead I was heading to the sidelines to cheer on the runners and walkers that would soon fill the streets of Cincinnati.

 

With my camera in hand I headed to mile eight of the race to meet the other family and friends who planned to cheer on their loved ones. As the front runners rounded the corner our excitement grew. These runners were impressive, and our job was to encourage them along the way. As the swarms of runners grew, our support became even more important. For many this was their first marathon, and as these tired runners came to the brink of a three-mile uphill surge, it was clear that bringing a smile to their faces would help alleviate their pangs of fatigue.

With this in mind I began cheering more loudly, trying my best to get a nod, a wave or a smile from the many runners. Yet all my attempts were not nearly as successful as the outstretched hands of young children. Standing on either side of me were five of them. Initially they seemed unsure of how to approach the runners, tentatively holding out their hands or even backing away.

But their tentativeness quickly changed when several runners with large smiles on their faces reached out to share a high-five with the children. The response of the runners was exciting. They boldly stepped off the curb and with broad smiles, held their hands out towards the runners. And the runners reciprocated – many times coming from the other side of the street in order to share a high-five with these beaming little faces.

The connection of the young children with the runners was magical. They didn’t have to say anything, the runners were simply drawn to them, and I think it’s because children live in the moment. They do not worry about what they are not doing or what they could have done better – they simply approach the world with wonder and awe. For these children the marathon was a new experience and sharing a high-five with runners was building their confidence and bringing joy – to both of them!

So, I suggest you “high-five” the children in your life. The connection will alleviate your fatigue and your children will more confidently step off the curb and join in the race!

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